Friday, May 4, 2012

Melophobia (Fear of music)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Fiph2qjbXq4/TRyKINWtK2I/AAAAAAAAACs/z-nqVqCs3rc/s1600/f_CJFilomMusim_4a67278.jpg 

What is Melophobia?

Melophobia is the fear of music.

What are the causes?

It is generally accepted that phobias arise from a combination of external events (i.e. traumatic events) and internal predispositions (i.e. heredity or genetics). Many specific phobias can be traced back to a specific triggering event, usually a traumatic experience at an early age. Social phobias and agoraphobia have more complex causes that are not entirely known at this time. It is believed that heredity, genetics, and brain chemistry combine with life-experiences to play a major role in the development of phobias. (Wikipedia - phobia).

What are the symptoms?

As with any phobia, the symptoms vary by person depending on their level of fear. The symptoms typically include extreme anxiety, dread and anything associated with panic such as shortness of breath, rapid breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, excessive sweating, nausea, dry mouth, nausea, inability to articulate words or sentences, dry mouth and shaking. .

Can I take medicine?

Medicine can be prescribed, but please note that these medications can have side effects and/or withdrawal systems that can be severe. It is also importation to note that medicines do not cure phobias, at best they only temporarily suppress the systems. However, there are treatments for phobias, which include counseling, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, and Neuro-Linguistic programming. Please click on the link at the top of the page called “Treatment Information” to find out more information on these types of treatments.

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Xanthophobia (Fear of the colour yellow)


Xanthophobia is a fear of the colour yellow. This fear may include the sun, daffodils, yellow paint, and the Yellow Pages.

Xanthophobic behaviour has been described in sea turtle hatchlings, helping them to visually find the sea after hatching. But humans can have it too.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Chaetophobia (Fear of hair)

http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000684961/polls_Trichophobia_Fear_of_Hair_22538_0947_69439_poll_xlarge.jpegChaetophobia (from the Greek χαίτη, "loose, flowing hair") is fear of hair. Sufferers fear may be associated with human hair and / or animal hair. They fear people / animals with an excess amount of hair. They may also fear the hair on their own body. Some only fear detached or loose hair and do not mind attached hair.

Causes

As with most phobias this fear could be the result of a negative experience with hair and / or a hairy person. The anxiety starts when the person remembers an experience whenever they are near a person with an excess amount of hair. Hair loss can be a trigger to this phobia, such as men going bald.

Fear

Some sufferers fear the hair on their own bodies because they think it's dirty or unattractive. They may fear things such as dandruff or head lice. This phobia is thought to be a spin off of germaphobia, the fear of germs. 


They become obsessed with removing every hair on their body. This fear is often hygiene-related and sufferers feel uncomfortable in environments such as solons where hair is detached and on the ground. Some fear loose hair in their food or on furniture even if it is their own.

Treatment

Intensive therapy and / or medication may have an effect on the anxiety side of the phobia. As with most phobias support groups and self relaxation techniques are some times effective in helping with the fear.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Papaphobia (fear of the Pope)

http://www.oddee.com/_media/imgs/articles/a289_pope.jpg

Regarded as one of the most benevolent and wonderful individuals in the world, millions flock to him, hoping for his blessing... except for those who suffer "Papaphobia": an abnormal or persistent pathological fear of the pope or the papacy.



Symptoms can include: shortness of breath, rapid breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, nausea, and overall feelings of dread. And it might not be only about the pope himself; a person with papaphobia may also be fearful of the Roman Catholic Church, so keep that popemobil away from them!

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Arachibutyrophobia (fear of experiencing peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth)



Arachibutyrophobia is defined as the fear of experiencing peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth.
If you are victim of this phobia, then you will definitely try to shun situation where you will be compelled to eat peanut butter.
But prior to understanding the intensity of this phobia, it is more important to understand what is phobia.

Understanding Arachibutyrophobia
Arachi, a glutinous oil ingredient is said to be present in butter and nuts. Though research has failed to show whether there is any link between the oil and the person suffering from Arachibutyrophobia.
The actual problem brought by peanuts is the presence of silicon gel type properties that get stuck to the upper part of the mouth.
When the sticky thing gets into the mouth and dissolves with the saliva it is impossible for it to get bonded at any particular part of the mouth because of the watery situation.
But the roof of the mouth is the only part which remains a bit dry thus helping the sticky thing to get tangled in their. It feels very annoying when the butter gets stuck to the upper part of the mouth and you are unable to pull it out in the public crowd.

The Symptoms
The symptoms are shaking, feeling of nausea and sickness, sweating, dizziness, heart palpitation, inability to speak and work properly, feelings of nausea and anxiety attacks.
Embarrassment is the core of the problem, which prevents the sufferers from having peanuts any more.
Though the symptoms can vary from person to person, few people are so much haunted by the fear of sticky butter, that they even hate the sight of glass jars.

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Carcinophobia (Fear of cancer)


The fear of cancer, carcinophobia, is one of the top ten most common phobias, and it's not hard to imagine why. No one wants to develop cancer or see a loved one suffering from it. Although it is normal to dread getting ill, people with cancer phobia experience an irrational amount of fear that often takes over their lives. Overcoming carcinophobia used to take months or even years.

It is easy to imagine what can cause carcinophobia. This fear is associated with a fear of illness, death, and loss of control. Many sufferers feel traumatized by a loved one's experience with cancer. People who have lost a friend or family member to cancer, or are at risk of developing the disease, live in fear of the day when they are diagnosed with cancer.
 

Friday, April 6, 2012

Scholionophobia (Fear of universities, school, day care, ...)

http://universityofharvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/university.jpg
Scholionophobia (school fear, daycare fear, college fear, university fear, pre-school fear, ...)
is the fear of school. Most kids tend to get this phobia because they fear leaving their parents and the security of being home to go to school.
 Scholionophobia is considered to be a specific phobia, which is discussed in the previous post.
Scholionophobia is also known as Scolionophobia and related to Didaskaleinophobia (fear of going to school).

What are the causes?
It is generally accepted that phobias arise from a combination of external events (i.e. traumatic events) and internal predispositions (i.e. heredity or genetics). Many specific phobias can be traced back to a specific triggering event, usually a traumatic experience at an early age. Social phobias and agoraphobia have more complex causes that are not entirely known at this time. It is believed that heredity, genetics, and brain chemistry combine with life-experiences to play a major role in the development of phobias. (Wikipedia - phobia).

What are the symptoms?
As with any phobia, the symptoms vary by person depending on their level of fear. The symptoms typically include extreme anxiety, dread and anything associated with panic such as shortness of breath, rapid breathing, irregular heartbeat, sweating, excessive sweating, nausea, dry mouth, nausea, inability to articulate words or sentences, dry mouth and shaking. .

Can I take medicine?
Medicine can be prescribed, but please note that these medications can have side effects and/or withdrawal systems that can be severe. It is also importation to note that medicines do not cure phobias, at best they only temporarily suppress the systems. However, there are treatments for phobias, which include counseling, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, and Neuro-Linguistic programming. Please click on the link at the top of the page called “Treatment Information” to find out more information on these types of treatments.